During the 2016 presidential election, Donald Trump promised to crack down on low-level marijuana offenses. The following year, he began to implement a new policy of targeting property seizures. While his recent statement that he was considering the rescheduling of cannabis has caused a buzz over social media, it’s interesting to note that his administration has actually been ramping up such seizures.

Donald Trump was elected President on November 8th, 2016. One of his campaign promises was to legalize cannabis on a federal level. However, on December 14th, 2017 the Department of Justice (DOJ) published a memo ordering federal prosecutors to use their discretion in deciding how to prioritize federal cannabis prosecutions. This comes as a surprise to many because it appears to be inconsistent with the federal government’s previous stance on cannabis enforcement. Since Donald Trump took office, the DEA – the federal agency in charge of enforcing the Controlled Substances Act – has ramped up the number of cannabis-related property seizures. The DOJ memo tries to explain the DOJ’s actions by saying that the Drug War is over. However, this is not the first time that the DOJ

The Trump administration has long been an enemy of marijuana and its supporters, wasting no opportunity to go after the cannabis plant in the United States. One of the largest crackdowns was conducted in the Bay State over the last year, with over 100 people charged with crimes related to cannabis.. Read more about high times news and let us know what you think.

Trump jacked-up cannabis property seizures during Covid In the midst of the Covid 19 pandemic, agents from the Federal Drug Enforcement Administration and their partners have stepped up the fight against cannabis. Still, the final year of Donald Trump’s tenure has not matched the sequestration rates of previous years. In 2020, agents seized $41 million worth of marijuana control agents. As usual, the vast majority of seizures (82%) and arrests (40%) occurred in California. Ahead of his electoral defeat in 2020, Trump is engaged in a political battle with the state over environmental and social justice issues. Between 2007 and 2017, including the first year of the US president’s administration, the Drug Enforcement Administration systematically seized $3.2 billion in cash from people who were never charged with a crime, according to a report by the Justice Department’s inspector general.

Post-Obama GOP steps up arrests and seizures

Trump jacked-up cannabis property seizures during Covid The number of seizures rose sharply at first, then fell steadily to about half during the second term of the Obama administration. For example, during his tenure, President Obama has pardoned more than 1,000 drug offenders and eased the Department of Justice’s approach to sentencing, while significantly reducing the number of cannabis-related arrests. In 2016, Republicans gained control of the White House and both branches of Congress in an effort to roll back medical marijuana and block legalization efforts. Trump-appointed Attorney General Jeff Sessions has identified asset forfeiture as an important law enforcement tool and has stepped up the practice. According to annual data from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, federal law enforcement agents and their partners seized more than four and a half million marijuana plants and made nearly 5,000 marijuana-related arrests in 2020. According to data released in a statistical report from the DEA’s National Cannabis Eradication/Suppression Program, agents and their partners seized approximately 4.54 million cannabis plants last year, a nearly 20 percent increase over 2019. Law enforcement officers also reported 4,992 marijuana-related arrests, slightly more than in 2019 (when officers reported 4,718 arrests). Both figures are significantly lower than a decade ago, when the DEA seized more than 8.7 million marijuana plants and made more than 8,500 arrests a year as part of a nationwide eradication and control operation. Since then, annual rates have mostly declined. NORML Deputy Director Paul Armentano commented on these trends: While marijuana enforcement is probably not the same priority for the DEA as it once was – likely due to changes in state politics and the federal budget – that doesn’t mean the agency simply turns a blind eye to violations of federal marijuana law. Thousands of Americans are arrested each year for violating federal marijuana laws, but about seven in 10 Americans believe the plant should be legal for adults to use and possess. If Congress passes pending marijuana reform legislation, those numbers should drop significantly.

Attacks increased again during the end of the pandemic

Federal agents seized more than four and a half million marijuana plants and made nearly 5,000 marijuana-related arrests in 2020, according to annual data from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. The Drug Enforcement Administration’s 2020 totals are available online. According to data released in a statistical report from the DEA’s National Cannabis Eradication/Suppression Program, agents and their partners seized approximately 4.54 million cannabis plants last year, a nearly 20 percent increase over 2019. Law enforcement officers also reported 4,992 marijuana-related arrests, slightly more than in 2019 (when officers reported 4,718 arrests). Both figures are significantly lower than a decade ago, when the DEA seized more than 8.7 million marijuana plants and made more than 8,500 arrests a year as part of a nationwide eradication and control operation. Since then, annual rates have mostly declined.

State-level asset recording is declining

NORML Deputy Director Paul Armentano commented on these trends: While marijuana enforcement is probably not the same priority for the DEA as it once was – likely due to changes in state politics and the federal budget – that doesn’t mean the agency simply turns a blind eye to violations of federal marijuana law. Still, thousands of Americans are arrested every year for violating federal marijuana laws, even though about seven in 10 Americans believe the plant should be legal for adult use and possession. As in previous years, the vast majority of seizures (82%) and arrests (40%) occurred nationally in California. Officers seized more than $41 million worth of marijuana control agents in 2020. DEA’s 2020 totals are available online.

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